Snake Dreaming Flutter dress  | 38cm Miniland doll | Aboriginal Art

Snake Dreaming Flutter dress | 38cm Miniland doll | Aboriginal Art

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A part of our special Indigenous collection created for the launch of the new Australian Aboriginal Miniland dolls we have now included a range to fit 32cm and 21cm Miniland dolls. 

These little flutter dresses are super child friendly. They have a stretchy elastic neckline, simply slip the dress over the head or up over the legs and tuck in the arms. 
Made from stunning authentic Aboriginal art works by various Australian Aboriginal artists.

 ** accessories not included

Snake Dreaming
by Sharoline Nampijinpa Frank; a Warlukurlangu Artist.

Warlukurlangu Artists is one of the longest running and most successful Aboriginal-owned art centres in Central Australia. Warlukurlangu Artists is based in the community of Yuendumu in Central Australia, located 290km northwest from Alice Springs. Purchases from Warlukurlangu Artists provides funds which support special projects to improve the health and well-being of all the community.

The story behind the art work- The place depicted in this painting, Ngama, is located south of Yuendumu in the Northern Territory. This Dreaming belongs to Nakamarra/Napurrurla women and Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This story describes the journey of Yarripiri, an ancestral ‘warna’ (snake). He travelled from Wirnparrku near Mt. Liebig to Yimparlu, and continued its way through the territories of Ngapanangka-jarra, Warlajirryi, Kurnmundu, Yinyirrinyi on to Ngama. Later Yarripiri travelled further north via Mijirlparnta (Mission Creek) and right through to the top end of Australia. Yarripiri was very sad as his family had left him behind at Wirnparrku. He was blind and crippled, but he was determined to follow and search them out. He had to be carried. This was the job undertaken by the ‘kurdungurlu’(ceremonial police) of the Dreaming: the Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Where Yarripiri's tail slumped and touched the ground creeks were formed, such as Mijirlparnta, west of Yuendumu. Yarripiri tracks and paths are often represented by arc shapes or curved lines depicted across the canva

About the dress maker:
My husband and daughter are Aboriginal; so it has always been important to me to teach Mia about her heritage, culture and family history. So I feel very honoured and proud to create this collection of clothing in collaboration with Miniland Dolls Australia and the launch of their new Australian Aboriginal Miniland dolls. 

Children learn through play; so incorporating these new Australian Aboriginal Miniland dolls and this collection of clothing featuring Aboriginal artwork is an exciting step towards improving all children’s knowledge and understanding of the Aboriginal history and culture.

Kim.

 


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